How to Make Bath Time Easier For Your Dog

Dog having bath Dogs
dog having bath
.

How To Make Bath Time Easier

Giving your dog a bath helps maintain their skin’s health. Doing it in excess will damage and irritate their skin and hair follicles, and expose your dog to the possibility of getting bacterial or fungal infections.

These tips will make the process of giving your dog a bath easier than ever.
When a dog enters a new home, he is introduced to lots of new sights, sounds, and smells. And the more he experiences early on, the more he becomes desensitized to those things. That means he won’t put up a fuss whenever he’s confronted with those things later on.

You can use a large plastic cup to repeatedly fill and pour water over your dog’s body to rinse out the soap, but that takes a ton more effort than using a handheld sprayer.
If your dog likes to play in water, then getting him to enter the bathtub won’t be a big deal. But if your dog isn’t sure what to think about the water and the confined space, then try this: A day or two before giving your dog a bath, encourage him to enter and exit the tub a few times. You may need to lead by example — either use a leash to “walk” him through the process of getting in and out of the tub; or just get in the tub first then excitedly call your dog to come in too (with no water of course). Every single time your dog gets in or out of the tub with you or on command, give him plenty of praise and dog treats.
Between six and twelve months old, most puppies will have grown their adult fur. One of the traits of adult fur in many dogs, is that it is fairly waterproof.

This waterproofing is made by oils from the skin. Plus, it helps keep your dog warm and comfortable when he swims or goes out in the rain. This is also what makes the smears you’ll see on a white wall if your dog regularly sleeps up against it!
Many dog owners get nervous when thinking about bathing their dog at home.
If your dog hates the thought of a bath it can also become a stressful activity for you, so here are some tips on how to achieve a harmonious bath time for both of you.

What If Your Dog Hates The Bath

If your dog hates the bath, it might be because of the sensory experience. For most dogs, one of the worst things about bathing in a tub, shower stall, or sink is feeling unsteady on the slippery, wet floor. It’s the same for humans. If you’ve ever slipped in the shower, you know that sliding around can not only be painful but anxiety-inducing.
There are two reasons that outdoor baths could be freaking your dog out. First off, that hose water? This is especially uncomfortable on a cold day, but even in the summertime, it can be too cold for your dog.
Giving your dog a bath is not always a howl of a good time – for you or your fur child. From the pre-bath trembles to the dreaded wet-dawg shakes, bathtime can be a messy, hairy hassle.
Bathing brush helps promote shiny coats. Use monthly when bathing your pet on wet hair.
If your dog hates the bath, it might be because of the sensory experience. For most dogs, one of the worst things about bathing in a tub, shower stall, or sink is feeling unsteady on the slippery, wet floor. It’s the same for humans. If you’ve ever slipped in the shower, you know that sliding around can not only be painful but anxiety-inducing.

What Do you Need To Know Before the Bath

Before starting your bath, put a mat or even a towel down on the floor of the bathtub to prevent your pup from falling. Sure, the towel will get soaked, but your pup will feel much more secure.
Before the bath, play the “Jump in the Tub” game. Toss treats into the tub, and when your dog jumps in to retrieve it, praise them. After a good belly rub, lead them out of the tub and throw another treat in for them to retrieve. This teaches your dog to associate positivity with being in the tub.
Keeping shampoo and conditioner away from your dog’s face will help keep their eyes from getting irritated. It’s very super to make sure the insides of your furbaby’s ears are kept dry as this will help prevent future ear infections.
Dog’s skin needs the natural oils it produces to promote healthy fur growth. Frequent bathing can strip the skin of these oils, causing dryness and irritation.
Dogs with long hair tend to get more dirt and debris trapped within it than their short-haired counterparts.
If you happen to get some water inside the ears, be sure to dry your dog’s ears gently using a microfiber towel, a washcloth, or a small hand towel.
Do not bath your dog too often because that will dry out the skin, deplete healthy oils from the coat and skin, and lead to scratching and irritation. Frequency is largely dependent on the breed and activities of the dog. Dogs who spend a lot of time outside or engage in outdoor activities that expose them to dirt, bug or debris typically require more bathing, perhaps every 6 weeks or more frequently. Some groomers recommend bathing double-coated breeds only about 3 times a year and suggest that smooth-coated dogs can go a lot longer between baths than can curly-coated breeds such as poodles. Too frequent bathing can cause the coat to soften and reduce its insulating qualities.

Follow our advices, and you and your dog will be clean and happy.

Rate article
Add a comment

  1. Donald Cole

    Good day

    I`m seeking a reputable company/individual to partner with in a
    manner that would benefit both parties. The project is worth
    $24 Million so If interested, kindly contact me through this
    email coledd11@clocdcolela.com for clarification.

    I await your response.

    Thanks,

    Donald Cole

    Reply
  2. Donald Cole

    Good day

    I contacted you some days back seeking your cooperation in a matter regarding funds worth $24 Million, I urge you to get back to me through this email coledd11@cloedcolela.com if you’re still interested.

    I await your response.

    Thanks,

    Donald Cole

    Reply